Startup Acquisition Stories Podcast w/ Christine McDannell, Founder of The Magnolia Firm

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Transcription –

Andrew Gazdecki:
All right. I am here with Christine McDannell from the Magnolia Firm. Christine, how you doing today?

Christine McDannell:
I’m good, Andrew. Thanks for having me on.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, thanks so much for being on. I feel like we were just talking before we started recording and we’ve been working together for a while now. So super excited to have you on the podcast. But for those that may not know you or your firm, do you want to give maybe a brief introduction of yourself?

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, definitely. So I have done my own transactions. I’ve built and sold a bunch of companies. I used a broker on the first one. And so yeah, after all these years, 19 years of entrepreneurship and doing my own deals, people were coming to me last year and wanting me to help with their deals, some friends of mine. And I came in as a consultant, I did their transactions, loved it. So I was like, “Hey, let’s make it official.” I’ve always wanted to start a boutique M&A firm, a business brokerage. And yeah, we just had our one year anniversary. It’s October-

Andrew Gazdecki:
Congrats.

Christine McDannell:
Thanks. And it’s been a wild ride. I mean, we started last October, we closed five transactions in the month of December. It was absolutely nuts.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Wow.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, it’s been fun. It’s been fun.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Nice. So you’re an M&A advisor and that can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people, in terms of what you do. Basically, what do you do? For those that may not be familiar with an M&A advisor, how would you describe the benefit that you play in the role of an acquisition for a founder business?

Christine McDannell:
Ooh, great question. So we’re strictly on the seller side and we source out for strategics a lot of these types of companies we work with, so we need to find somebody to Acquire them and so we do a lot of outbound. We also have a lot of inbound. So a lot of other listings are smaller and those are going to be first time buyers, which I love, love holding their hand through the process because they’re typically unrepresented. We get a lot of seller leads from you guys, which we love and we’re super grateful for. But then the buyers come from all different platforms. We don’t take a lot of listings because we’re boutique and we want to sell them very quickly, so we don’t want to be overwhelmed. And so we’re very picky.
We have a waiting list. We definitely charge more than the average advisor, and that’s by design because we’re literally doing A to Z. So we are covering everything. We’re doing a pitch deck for them, we’re doing the ad copy, we’re running them all the way through LOI, all the way through the purchase agreement, all the way to the day the money’s wired in the count, and we’re pretty much handling everything on the back end. Our team is amazing. So the only, only time I’m bringing my seller in is once we’ve pre-qualified a potential buyer, I found out do they have access to capital, are they qualified, are they serious. Then we’re coming on a Zoom with this actual seller for 30 minutes to see if it’s a fit, to see if they want to write an offer. So it’s a pretty smooth transaction, but it’s a lot on the backend for us, but we love it.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Nice. I love the A to Z reference, because I’ve seen you do it multiple times. And just for additional context for listeners, Christine is one of our top M&A advisors within my core network. So we definitely appreciate all the help that you do for founders. But now I’m just thinking, in terms of the deals that you’ve closed, it sounds like a number of them in one year, which is really impressive, do you have maybe one or two of the favorite deals that you’ve helped get Acquired that you’d like to share?

Christine McDannell:
Yes, definitely. I have two quick stories. So Grace with TripKit was on your podcast not too long ago. So we did her transaction, so that was great. We’re picky in a lot of ways. Also the founders we work with, I just want to make sure we get along and we vibe because it could get stressful, it could be an emotional rollercoaster no matter how much we take off their plate. It’s an emotional transaction. It’s usually the biggest transaction of their life. So Grace was amazing to work with. That’s such a rad company. The buyer was incredible. He made a decision very quickly on closing the transaction. From when he saw the company to when we closed, it was maybe one to two weeks. It was very quick. He was a first time buyer. He was great to work with.
So that was one story. Another story was a recent transaction where we got the seller from you guys and she was amazing. We loved working with her. And so we actually had one LOI and then the next LOI that came right in was for $40K more. This guy, he just was like, “I want this company so bad, all cash, full price.” And he’s like, “But I’ll pay more than the other LOI,” because the other LOI was full price, 20% seller carry. So there’s a little bit of liability on my seller and I want to do what’s best for them. So yeah, he came in $40K extra and I said, “Hey, we’ll say no the other guy if you can close within one day.”
And he did. It was so crazy. So from the morning, he came in and then he met with the seller in the afternoon. We did LOI same day and then we did due diligence and then he closed and wired the money the very next day. So happy seller for sure. And again, he was amazing too, unrepresented also. So again, I love working both sides of the deal. It’s fun for me.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, I can definitely tell by your enthusiasm. I mean the success of the deals closing speaks for itself. I’m going to throw kind of a curve ball question at you. So I was on LinkedIn today and I saw a picture of you and Richard Branson. I didn’t have a chance to look through that post, but can I get the two minute version of that story? And for those listening, it was a picture of Christine and Richard Branson, having lunch together.

Christine McDannell:
It was breakfast, but close enough, in Paris-

Andrew Gazdecki:
We call it brunch. Call it a medal.

Christine McDannell:
I know, right? So yeah, anybody listening to this, I’m great at LinkedIn. If you want to connect on LinkedIn, would love that. I put it as one of my featured posts so you’ll see it on there. Because I haven’t really shared this story. It was five years ago, I never shared on LinkedIn. He’s my business idol and it was my dream to meet him in person. And so I tell the whole story. There’s even a video and it’s fun watching the video because it’s flashbacks all the way to 2013 when I was obsessed with him. I’d make video blogs and talk about him. So it shows all those years of that. And then, yeah, 2017, I exited my last company or one of my companies. I had a few. It was a real big exit and I wrote a sizable check to his charity. And so I wrote two checks, one was small and that one was big. So yeah, he’s amazing. It was so much fun having breakfast with him. I’m a massive fan, massive.

Andrew Gazdecki:
I’m a huge fan too. Tell me if this is true. He’s one of those entrepreneurs that’s kind of reached celebrity status. People will come up to him, they know him. He’s kind of a global, icon if you will, but he doesn’t have security. He’s a really down earth person. Very approachable. Is that-

Christine McDannell:
Oh yeah, I ran up-

Andrew Gazdecki:
Accurate?

Christine McDannell:
It’s very accurate. In 2015, he was speaking in San Diego and he was walking off the stage and I ran up to the stage and I handed him the first check. First check was only in grands, all I could do, first charity. I was like, “Richard Branson, I love you so much, you’re so inspiring.” I give him the check and I ran and he called my cell phone half an hour later to thank me, which is so crazy.

Andrew Gazdecki:
What?

Christine McDannell:
But no, there’s no security and I just ran up to him. But everybody at that event was like, “Richard, I want you to sign my book. I want a picture with you, I want you to invest in my company.” It was sad to see everybody trying to take from him. So I think it was different for someone just to give him a check and run off.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah.

Christine McDannell:
But he’s so down earth. Yeah, he doesn’t have security or nothing like that. He’s a good guy.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, that amazed me. I can’t remember who told me that, but I just asked a question like, “Who’s the most down earth person that you met that’s kind of a billionaire or something like that?” And they were like, “Oh, Richard Branson.” I think they were raising capital for a fund or something like that and Richard Branson was just kind of walking around in sandals or something like that.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, there’s this saying that says, “Don’t meet your idols because he’ll disappoint you.” There’s a quote and he exceeded. I thought of him as a human and we got to talk about him going to space. And he thought he was going to do within six months, Virgin Galactic, he said he spent double what he would think he would spend. He said it was super crazy stressful, which was kind of interesting to see a billionaire still get just a little stressed when we talked about that. And I know he just went recently, so I was like, “Oof.” He was supposed to do in 2018. So I was excited to see him accomplish it.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, I mean he is an amazing figure, no doubt. So moving back to acquisitions as the topic, given that you work with so many different businesses, what would be maybe some reasons you would not work with a particular startup, if they’re looking to sell their business? What are some yellow flags or red flags?

Christine McDannell:
And I’ve watched some of your amazing previous podcasts and you guys have talked about it before and you guys are great about, on your marketplace, weeding out the ones that aren’t obviously ready to sell. So zero revenue or being upside down, obviously. So pre-revenue, that’s not going to work. And I’ve had a tech company, I get it. You spend $600K on building the software and you think you’re at least going to get that or more. And that’s not necessarily true. So that’s kind of hard to tell people.

Andrew Gazdecki:
I got to say, that’s my least favorite. Because we do see a lot of that, “Well, I spent $500,000 building this, so it’s now therefore worth $500,000.” No. There’s so many factors, you probably could have developed it at a lower cost. And number two, no one cares. That’s a tough one, but we see that quite a bit. So I agree with you there.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah. And again, we have a waiting list so we can be super duper picky. Anybody listening, it’s definitely still a seller’s market. The R word isn’t scaring anybody. The Fed raising the rates is not. It’s just a seller’s market still, which is amazing. So we’re able to be this picky, but reputation is huge. I tell everybody even starting a company that I consult with, I’m like, “All you need to care about is your reputation from day one. Guard that like crazy because there’s so much value with that.” We Google the sellers. I do more due diligence than the buyers, I swear to God. I’m in the Facebook groups, I’m looking at comments. I’m on the Instagram page, I’m looking at comments. Are there people complaining? Are they replying back and helping them out? So yeah, we’re big on, “They got to have a really good reputation and five stars and not a bunch of complaints online.” I mean, these are online businesses so that’s important.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Nice. I couldn’t agree with that more. I think one unfortunate thing that we see a lot of Acquire is founders kind of being their own worst enemies where they’re really difficult to work with or they withhold certain information or they aren’t sure if they want to sell sometimes. And they’re very standoffish. And I think that has led to some really great companies just not being sold because a founder just doesn’t have that professionalism in terms of selling their business. I’m not sure if I’m wording this correctly, but just being difficult to work with because when you buy the business, it’s not like buying a car where you just get the keys and they’re gone. There’s usually some period of transition and you want to know that this person’s going to deliver on their word. And if you start off a call just on very hard stance, “I’m firm on this price,” and it just feels like there’s no, I guess, leeway in terms of building a relationship or connection that’s going to go beyond just wiring money, I’ve always seen that as kind of a pivot. What’s your thoughts on that?

Christine McDannell:
Oh my gosh, you’re exactly right. For the seller and the buyers. Same with the buyers. We’ve had six LOIs coming in on one deal, two weeks of negotiating all of them, which I love negotiating so it was fun, but some of the guys weren’t that nice. And so some of these potential buyers come in with attitude from the start, they don’t build rapport with the seller and the seller, no matter how much money, they might pick somebody else, because they’re going to have to hand off, they’re going to have to train, they’re going to have to that person. And I think that’s the number one thing we’re proud of at the firm. I’m like, “I’m going to find you the most amazing buyer.” The money, of course that’s important. I’m going to find you the most amazing buyer. And people can go to our website, you can read our testimonials, you can talk to those my sellers because they love all their buyers.
And then you’re right, we’ve been lucky. I’ve never had a seller waiver on selling their company ever. We’re not attracting that. Most of our sellers are in their thirties. It’s their first exit and they’re ready. They got the next project already rolling, right? They’re like, “We got to sell this quick. My next company’s already growing.” Grace is an example of that. So every single seller that comes to me is ready to go. They’re like, “I want to sell the business yesterday.” So I haven’t had that. They’re always flexible. The two we recently took off your guys’ platform that we’re helping, they were way underpriced. So we increased it significantly because I was like, “Hey, guys…” But again, their next venture is making so much money that it becomes loss opportunity cost. So they’re like, “Ah, let’s just unload it quick.” I’m like, “Hey, let’s raise it and unload it quick. How about that?”

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, I like that. I like how you brought up the buyer too because buyers can also be just as bad. On Acquire, you send an initial message and first impressions are so important in terms of introducing yourself, giving a compliment, why are you interested in the business? And just that little bit of effort can go such a long ways instead of just, “What’s your numbers and what’s your price?” Unless the number is kind of like, “All right, well, I’ll put up with anything for this,” but generally there needs to be, like you said, some good rapport between the two parties because you’re transferring assets, you’re planning out a transition, you’re planning out a close date, maybe specific terms where you can be flexible.
It just goes so much farther when there’s that level of, “I could work with this person and I would be happy seeing this person run something that I had built.” So I love that you brought that up. I asked this question on pretty much every podcast, so you probably know it’s coming. But what are maybe the top three tips you give to sellers when you’re working with them in terms of selling their business?

Christine McDannell:
So this one might be a little woo-woo, but I’ve done it so many times on my own, I’ve had friends do it and it works. It’s crazy. But I have them manifest the perfect buyer and the way the whole transaction’s going to go, but in past tense. So it’s like, “This was my buyer. He is so amazing.” My one friend, Sarah, she wrote a whole thing and she’s like, “I’m going to sell to the first person I pitch,” blah, blah, blah. And she shares it with me and I’m like, “Sarah, I don’t think you’re going to sell to the first person we pitch.” And what’s so funny is she only did a total of about seven or eight pitches and the first guy is the one that bought her company. So this manifesting stuff really works. So they’re reading it each day and I just believe in that stuff, right?
It’s just kind of creating that. So that’s kind of one tip, that I think people should write it out in past tense, like it already happened. And I’ve done it and it works. And so second tip for sellers? There’s so many. Be ready for the emotional rollercoaster. Again, I think some aren’t, towards the end especially. Oh sorry, this is my tip. This is tip 2.5, is don’t spend the money. I tell them multiple times, once we get that LOI, even once we get that PA signed, purchase agreement, not until the money’s wired, I go, “Do not go shopping. Do not buy a house, do not buy a car, don’t spend the money even in your head because if it falls through, you’re going to be super disappointed.” So do not, do not. And then one bought a house. Right before close, the deal fell out and it’s tricky with a house, because you need to show income. It’s super tricky to do that, right?
Luckily we found another buyer super quick, within three weeks, thank God. We closed on the same closing date with another buyer. It was like magic. So she’s fine. I know it was crazy, thank God because she was crying on the phone and I was like, “Oh my god, how are we going to do this?” And then I did it with another of my sellers. I said, “Hey…” That’s the one that got the two LOIs simultaneously. I said, “Hey…” I don’t promise this will happen but this happened back in April. It fell through. It had a closing day to April 30th. But we found another buyer and closed on that day. And then with the second one, we actually closed earlier. I can’t promise you we’ll do that. And we closed even earlier. So it was all good.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Man, that’s absolutely crazy. I agree with you on all points. One piece of advice that I’ve always been given from other entrepreneurs that have gone through exits is not to spend the money for a whole year, 12 months, just so it sinks in. You don’t change your life, you don’t go out and buy something stupid, which you probably will if you get a windfall of money. That was advice from my initial investor, Christian Freeman in my first company. And depending on how big of the acquisition it is, if it’s truly life-changing where you can buy a house, I’m a big fan of just wait even three months, six months. And then the last thing I would probably add, I love your tips, is just continue to sell until close. The deal is not done until it’s done and the wire is transferred or the earn out is over.

Christine McDannell:
No, I’m glad you said that. So we actually coach our sellers up front. I’m like, “We’re going to handle everything. Don’t worry about us. Okay. All I care about is you growing your company. Do whatever it takes.” I run marathons, so I always say, “It’s like mile 23, you’re on it. You got three miles more to go and you have to sprint that.” So it’s starting a startup vibe, right? I’m like, “It’s going to be a lot of work so just please do that,” because that helps tremendously when these perspective buyers see it’s continued to grow, it helps when it’s under contract. They’re like, “Wow, she’s still growing. This is great.” It helps from it falling out. And a last tip, which I don’t ever see this and thank God I did it with my own transaction, that big one, is send a weekly exciting email.
And we help the seller do this. Every single week, we’re sending that buyer an exciting email of like, “Hey, this is a new initiative we launched this week. Hey, these are our sales numbers. Hey…” Et cetera, et cetera. And keeping them completely excited and engaged the whole way until the close. I had to do it for three and a half months every single week because it was a massive loan and it got delayed and it almost fell out because the appraisal came in so low and I stuck to the full price offer. But I know they would’ve dropped if they weren’t so excited and engaged in watching me grow the company for three and a half months. So that’s a big one.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, I think that’s just great wisdom in terms of how to think about selling your business because acquisitions can be such a distraction in terms of how much time, energy, especially if it doesn’t work out. And honestly sometimes the best distraction can be just growing your business. Obviously engage with sellers, but if you drop everything and your business is neglected because of it, I haven’t seen this on Acquire, but I’ve read just counting the stories of a seller dragging them along for six months or something like that, taking tons of resources. So not only is it costly to the growth of your business, but it’s costly just in terms of your time, which time is money, time is resources. So I highly recommend to keep growing. And one thing, just to give a personal tidbit of my own, when I sold business apps, we got an initial LOI and had to basically continue growing at the same pace for three months and then we would start due diligence, which was kind of nice.
It was like, “Oh, okay, I don’t know where this is going to go, but you’re just telling me to focus on growing my business.” And so we obviously kept growing the business, we didn’t do anything crazy in terms of accelerating. We just were growing at the same predictable pace. But I think that mental exercise could be helpful for some founders. Even if you get an LOI, just keep growing your business in the exact same way as even if you didn’t get an LOI. And then once it comes into due diligence, keep growing your business because again, a deal is not done until it’s completely done and the money is actually in your hands. Let’s see, what else do I got? I guess, what do you see coming for the next year in terms of acquisitions? I would agree with you in terms of we haven’t really seen too much change in terms of acquisitions on our end at Acquire. Have you seen or do you foresee anything changing in the next 12 months?

Christine McDannell:
I mean we definitely have had even more of a flood of people that want to sell their company, but it’s not out of like, “Oh, I’m scared of the…” I don’t even saying recession because it’s like you got to just press on no matter what. And actually the biggest companies were grown and built during recessions, mine included. So I’m war time general in the peace times, so I actually like those times. But yeah, I don’t hear that right now. It’s not like, “Oh my God, I’m scared I’m going to sell my company.” There’s none of that. It’s like, “Oh, I’m building another company.” And I foresee that in the near future. I’ve actually talked with other brokers and advisors like I wasn’t there in ’08 doing this. So they said ’08 to 2010 was like their heyday because the stock market and everything else is so volatile.
And that’s what’s happening right now. Crypto, stock market, everybody’s jumping out to something more stable, something with an ROI, that’s predictable. So then they’re starting to buy businesses. COVID made a massive… Oh my gosh. I have a lot of corporate first time buyers, people getting out of corporate because they had that freedom during COVID, now they’re back at work and not working from home and they don’t like it. And they could pull from their $401k with the Roths, especially if they quit. So I foresee that continuing on. If people are like, “I just want to control my own destiny and I want to buy business,” that’s cash flowing. I mean the magical number seems to be about $120K net profit a year because somebody can quit their job, maybe not in California, but quit their job and live on that, right?

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah.

Christine McDannell:
And so that’s this magical number. So yeah, we’re typically not taking any clients under that. They need at least net out that much in STE. So yeah, I mean think it’s going to be good for the next whenever future for a while here.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, I would agree with that. I think the only concern I have in the market, we’ll see what happens, but just companies that raised a lot of capital in the venture markets, we’ve actually had to turn away some that raised millions of dollars and the revenue is less than a couple hundred thousand. And we’re just like, “I don’t know who’s going to buy this. This is acqui-hire situation.” So I think we’re going to see maybe more of that. But in terms of those that are building sustainable, profitable, healthy businesses, I would put a bet that those are going to be valued even more just because, like you said, there’s going to be a lot of capital cycling out of public markets and even just private startup investing maybe jumping into entrepreneurship to acquisition. But if I had a crystal ball, I’d obviously be making bets on it, but I have no idea. That’s just a guess.

Christine McDannell:
I’m so glad you brought that up. And I was part of that. I started a tech company in 2018. We sold it last year. It was very expensive to build out, of course. We didn’t hit revenue and so we had to sell it at a discount last year. But it was like a fun time. I was in Los Angeles, it’s 2018, we were raising on a $10 million cap, pre rev, which is absolutely insane, right?

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah.

Christine McDannell:
I’ve been through that and you’re exactly right. It was so sexy to be a startup. I already see the tide shifting and I’m so glad because you guys are on the forefront of this, which is really cool. I promise you that now the sexy thing is acquiring companies. I already see it. Acquiring cash flowing businesses, flipping them, playing that game, not playing the raise capital, burn a bunch of cash, not hit revenue game. So many people have seen the fall out of WeWork and all those companies. There’s massive fallout. So yeah, I think you’ve nailed it. I’m excited that you changed your name to Acquire.com. I think that was super smart. So excited about that, doing that change.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, that’s going to be a lot of work. So wish us luck. But the word is out.

Christine McDannell:
It is out.

Andrew Gazdecki:
So I got just maybe three quick questions. You care if we do a bit of rapid fire?

Christine McDannell:
Let’s do it.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Awesome. What’s your favorite book?

Christine McDannell:
Ooh, 4-Hour Workweek since it came out, 2005. Love it. It changed My Life.

Andrew Gazdecki:
I have never read that book and I feel like I need to, so I will now read that book given you recommended it.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah.

Andrew Gazdecki:
What is your favorite movie?

Christine McDannell:
Oh my gosh. So honestly, I’m not a movie person. Oh, it’s Wolf of Wall Street. I don’t watch many, many movies. But I love that movie for some reason.

Andrew Gazdecki:
It’s a good movie. I remember I saw it when it first came out in theaters and we were all just like, “Oh my gosh, this is a true story. Are you kidding me?”

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, Jordan Belford is quite the character. I’m sure it was embellished a lot, but I love that one.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Yeah, I mean, most movies are. Okay, final question. Who’s maybe an entrepreneur, aside from Richard Branson, that you think is awesome, you look up to? It could be someone big, it could be someone maybe not many people know about.

Christine McDannell:
Okay, great question, Alex Hormozi. If you guys want to look him up on YouTube, he’s sharp and he’s young. He’s like 30 years old, sold companies for multi-millions, I forgot how much. It’s insane. His marketing advice, his business advice, his strategy, operations, hiring, I mean the whole gamut. And he’s pumping out content like nobody’s business. I forget how many posts he does on all these different platforms. He’s hitting it pretty hard. And so you guys should check him on YouTube. I learn times every time. And I’ve seen him speak and Leila speak live recently at a marketing conference. So yeah, have you heard of him?

Andrew Gazdecki:
I have. He has a book, I think it’s called Million Dollar Offers and he also owns acquisitions.com. Yeah, I’ve heard him on podcasts. He’s a very unique and smart business… I believe it’s fitness related, but I’m not too familiar. But yeah, I definitely have respect for what he is accomplished because I think he is like 32 or 33.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, he’s super young. Yeah. So how about you? Who’s your favorite right now?

Andrew Gazdecki:
That’s a good question. I’m going to take the cop-out answer and just say my team.

Christine McDannell:
Aww, that’s so great.

Andrew Gazdecki:
They help me out with just so much stuff. I’m by far not the smartest person at Acquire. And it’s also just so fun to work with the people that are at the company. So that’s my cop out answer. But if I had to say a celebrity, I would probably say maybe Mark Cuban or Richard Branson. I really love that, “Okay, you’re a billionaire, you got it, that’s cool.” But I don’t think that’s the cool part. I think what’s cool is how they’re humble, but they’re up so high. I’ve seen videos of Mark Cuban just outside of a Trader Joe’s, giving a guy an interview and it’s just like, “You’re such a normal person.” And I just highly respect people who just don’t change when they see success, because too many do, unfortunately.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah. And shout out to your team too. So James and Paul, they are your team. Andrew is amazing. I love working with them. It’s so much fun. I love watching your guys’ growth. What you guys are doing is really needed, really needed.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Well, I definitely appreciate that and we’re super thrilled to be partnered with you and looking forward to helping more startups get Acquired. So Christine, thanks for joining me on this podcast. I had a blast.

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, no, same here. Thanks, Andrew.

Andrew Gazdecki:
So for those that maybe want to follow you, get a hold of you, where’s the best place to contact you?

Christine McDannell:
Yeah, I mean definitely personally LinkedIn. Go for it and I’m happy to communicate there. It’s very easy. You can check out our website, themagnoliafirm.co and there’s tons of stuff.

Andrew Gazdecki:
I’ll put that in the show notes.

Christine McDannell:
And then on social media, I play this character called Broker Bob, where I dress up as an old man. I just like being entertaining, especially on social media, so we’re on TikTok and Instagram, the Magnolia Firm, so you can check that out. I’m sure the brokers love that.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Oh, I haven’t seen that. I’ll definitely check that out. All right, Christine, it’s been fun.

Christine McDannell:
Okay, definitely. Thanks, Andrew.

Andrew Gazdecki:
All right, see you. Cheers.

Christine McDannell:
Okay, bye.

Andrew Gazdecki:
Bye.